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Paper Thin? Why All High School Diplomas Are Not Created Equal

Diploma_ReportFNL8Of the nearly 100 different types of high school diplomas that are awarded across all fifty states and the District of Columbia, less than half prepare students for success in college and career. And while the national high school graduation rate is at an all-time high, the rate at which students earn these college- and career-ready (CCR) diplomas is substantially lower, especially among students from low-income families, students of color, and other traditionally underserved students.

Paper Thin? Why All High School Diplomas Are Not Created Equal provides a state-by-state analysis of the different types of diplomas that states awarded to the Class of 2014 and the impact on traditionally underserved students.

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Paper Thin? Why All High School Diplomas Are Not Created Equal provides a state-by-state analysis of the different types of diplomas that states awarded to the Class of 2014 and evaluates whether each adequately prepares its recipient for college and a career.

 

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Less than 10% gap in states that automatically placed students in a CCR Diploma Pathway

Traditionally underserved students are less likely to graduate with a CCR diploma than their peers, but gaps are smaller in states such as Arkansas, Indiana, and Texas, all of which require all students to pursue a CCR diploma. In Texas, for example, 86.1 percent of white students and 85.7 percent of Latino students earned a CCR diploma—a difference of only 0.4 percentage points. In Maryland, which offers a CCR diploma but does not require students to pursue it, the CCR gap between the two student subgroups was more than 22 percentage points.

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“No parent wants less for their children,” said Alliance President Bob Wise. “Still, large percentages of students—particularly traditionally underserved students—across many states are pursuing diplomas that are paper thin. It is imperative for the future success of these students and the U.S. economy that all students and parents understand the importance of a college- and career-ready track in high school.”

Learn more in the report

 

Every Child a Graduate. Every Child Prepared for Life.