Real-time collaboration and continuous action
create ideal conditions for future success.
boilerplate image

National Policy Symposium On Middle-Level Education: Where Do We Go From Here?

Event:


Middle grades should prepare students academically and personally for the challenges of high school and beyond. For most students, future academic success or failure can be predicted based on indicators assessed as early as sixth grade, so failing to recognize middle-level education as the crucial link in the K–12 continuum seriously jeopardizes our efforts to reform high schools, raise graduation rates, and prepare all students for college and work. Middle schools do not operate in a vacuum. They reflect the aspirations of their local communities and are part of a system of education that determines their organizational structure, their funding, and their ability to define and hire high-quality teachers. The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) and other federal policies affect all aspects of middle-level education, yet there is no cohesive national policy for the middle grades.

How can educators and policymakers ensure that students in grades five through eight stay engaged in a challenging, standards-based curricula and begin to get the skills they need to be successful in the 21st century? What supports should be in place to help all students reach higher levels of achievement in literacy, math, and science? What is a highly-qualified, middle-level teacher? How do we ensure that every student has a graduation plan and an adult advocate to help them succeed? What kind of organizational structures, including extending the school day, have been used to ensure that students master “the basics” without narrowing the curriculum and eliminating physical education, exposure to foreign languages, the arts, and other exploratory courses?

The day-long symposium of policymakers, educators, and other stakeholders interested in strengthening secondary education at the middle level and developing a national middle-level policy, examined research, best practices, and policy to help answer these questions and more.

Event Agenda

I. Welcome and Introduction

Sue SwaimSue Swaim, Executive Director
National Middle School Association
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

 

II. Changing Middle Grade Culture – Higher Expectations And Higher Engagement
Middle grades should prepare all students personally and academically for high school. If we fail to recognize middle level education as a crucial link in the K-12 continuum, will our efforts to raise graduation rates fail? The panel discussed the important role of rigor and engagement in creating a culture of high expectations in successful middle schools.

Chris SwansonChris Swanson, Director
Editorial Projects in Education
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

 

Cynthia Board SchmeiserCynthia Board Schmeiser, President – Education Division
ACT
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

PowerPoint PresentationMiddle School: Higher Expectations and Higher Engagement

 

 

 

Michael J. PetrilliMichael J. Petrilli, Vice President of National Programs/Policy
Thomas B. Fordham Foundation
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

 

Sondra CooneySondra Cooney, Consultant
Southern Regional Education Board
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

Question & Answer Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

III. Keeping Students on Track – Critical Instructional Supports to Accelerate Teaching And Learning
For most students, the likelihood of future academic success or failure can be predicted based on indicators assessed as early as sixth grade. How can educators and policymakers use those crucial indicators to ensure students get what they need to succeed? What are the interventions that can keep at-risk students from falling off track?

Susan FrostSusan Frost, President
Education Priorities
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

 

Robert BalfanzRobert Balfanz, Professor, Johns Hopkins University, and
Co-Director, Talent Development Middle Schools Project
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

PowerPoint Presentation: Why Are Achievement Gains So Difficult to Realize in High Poverty Middle Grade Schools? What Can Be Done About It?

 

 

Hung-Hsi WuHung-Hsi Wu, Professor, UC Berkeley, and
Member, National Mathematics Advisory Panel
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

 

Tracy McDanielTracy McDaniel, Principal and Founder
KIPP, OK
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

 

Question & Answer Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

LUNCH

Bob WiseIntroduction:
Governor Bob Wise, President
Alliance for Excellent Education
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

Governor Gaston CapertonLunch Speaker:
Governor Gaston Caperton, President
The College Board
“The Role of Middle School Teachers in Preparing Students for a Rigorous High School Curriculum”
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

Congressman Chaka FattahThe Honorable Congressman Chaka Fattah, Pennsylvania 2nd
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

 

 

IV. Education Policy in the Middle
What is the outlook for policy action on middle schools? How has middle grade education looked in the past and how should that inform future policy? How can federal, state, and local policy move middle grade reform forward?

Bob WiseGovernor Bob Wise, President
Alliance for Excellent Education
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

 

Sue SwaimSue Swaim, Executive Director
National Middle School Association
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

 

Valerie A. WoodruffValerie A. Woodruff, Delaware Secretary of Education and President
Council of Chief State School Officers
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

 

Charles Hokanson

Charles Hokanson, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy and Strategic Initiatives
Office of Elementary and Secondary Education
U.S. Department of Education
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

Bob WiseGovernor Bob Wise, President
Alliance for Excellent Education
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

 

V. Middle Schools that Work
What do the best middle schools have in common? How can we learn from middle schools that are already succeeding? Where is the consensus on what works? What does the research say about practice and policy? How can we replicate successful efforts?

Dr. Vince AnfaraDr. Vince Anfara, Chair
National Middle School Association’s Research Advisory Board
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

 

Deborah KasakDeborah Kasak, Executive Director
National Forum to Accelerate Middle-Grades Reform
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

 

Rosa AronsonRosa Aronson, Director of Advocacy and Strategic Alliance
National Association of Secondary School Principals
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

 

Question & Answer  Video (Streaming Audio (MP3)*

VI. Closing Remarks

Valerie A. WoodruffValerie A. Woodruff, Delaware Secretary of Education, and
President of the Council of Chief State School Officers
Video Video (StreamingAudio Audio (MP3)*

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Uncategorized
thumbnail

Action Academy

Welcome to the Alliance for Excellent Education’s Action Academy, an online learning community of education advocates. We invite you to create an account, expand your knowledge on the most pressing issues in education, and communicate with others who share your interests in education reform.

Register Now

or register for Action Academy below:


Join the Conversation

Your email is never published nor shared.

What is this?
Multiply 11 by 5 =
The simple math problem you are being asked to solve is necessary to help block spam submissions.

Close

 

Every Child a Graduate. Every Child Prepared for Life.