Real-time collaboration and continuous action
create ideal conditions for future success.
boilerplate image

First Annual American High School Policy Conference

Event:


Challenges Confronting High Schools: Literacy, Adequacy, and Equity

PowerPoint presentations, student vignettes, and conference videos available below…

Reports:

Adolescents and Literacy: Reading for the 21st Century (November 2003)
Examines the reliable, empirical research that exists on how to improve the literacy of children in grades four through 12. It brings together the key findings of the best available research on issues related to adolescent literacy. It also offers policymakers and the public a better understanding of the challenges and opportunities that confront the nation as it begins to work to improve the literacy levels of older children. The report demonstrates that we already know a great deal about reading comprehension and about effective methods for helping students of all ages become better readers.

The Literacy Coach: A Key to Improving Teaching and Learning in Secondary Schools (November 2003)
Helps to develop an understanding of what works in successful programs as well as successful strategies for training effective literacy coaches.

2003 Progress Report on American High Schools (November 2003) – Out of Print
The Progress Report on American High Schools 2003-04 uses recent policy reports, publicly available information, and information obtained from interviews with state and national officials, to provide a snapshot of the current condition of America’s high schools. Using state lists available as of November 1, 2003, the Alliance identified the number of high schools in need of improvement, and, using U.S. Department of Education data, we identified those with 75 percent or more students eligible for free- or reduced- price lunch.

Supplemental Documents

State Accountability Plans: Using information from the approved state plans and the expertise of individuals at the state Departments of Education, this section of the report includes summaries of the accountability plans.
State Profiles: General school data, funding information, number of schools “in need of improvement,” teacher and counselor information, NAEP scores, and other demographics in an easy-to-read format.
Individual state accountability plans and state statistics are also available on the state-by-state page.

Investing in the Education of Older Students: A Summary of the Evidence (November 2003) – Out of Print

Presents the conclusions of noted economists who looked at this question for the Alliance, as well as a compilation of additional research from other sources. This report represents a summary of the two reports found below:
Public and Private Benefits of Education for At-Risk Youth and the Alliance for Excellent Education Framework by Duncan Chaplin
Analytical Framework for Assessing the Potential Return on a Federal Investment in the Alliance for Excellent Education’s Every Child a Graduate by Dan Goldhaber

Additional Documents:

Fact Sheets:

The Impact of Education on: Health & Well-Being -(November 2003) – Out of Print
Evidence suggests that the health and well-being of an individual drastically improves just by obtaining a high school diploma. High school graduates live longer, are less likely to be teen parents, produce healthier and better educated children, and rely less on social services.

The Impact of Education on: The Economy (November 2003) – Out of Print
High school dropouts are unable to enter the workforce with the necessary skills to meet the demands of the nation’s global economy. Increasing the number of graduates with a quality education will raise national revenues and will reduce billions of dollars in public and private expenditures currently spent on rectifying the shortcomings of a failed high school education.

The Impact of Education on: Crime (November 2003) – Out of Print
Students who fail to graduate from high school are more likely to participate in criminal activity than students who do graduate. Likewise, students with low levels of achievement in high school are more likely to engage in crime than students with high levels of achievement. Investing in education would save millions of dollars in crime related expenditures annually.

Impact of Education on: Personal Income & Employment  (November 2003) – Out of Print
Six million students throughout America are currently at risk of dropping out of school. High school dropouts are unable to enter the workforce with the necessary skills to meet the demands of the nation’s global economy. Jobs that require advanced skills are growing; students who attain higher levels of education will have better employment opportunities and increased income.

The Impact of Education on: Poverty & Homelessness  (November 2003) – Out of Print
Six million students throughout America are currently at risk of dropping out of school. Many of these individuals will require social services such as welfare and Medicaid, thus increasing monetary demands on local, state, and federal revenues. Evidence shows that investing in education would yield a decrease in poverty and homelessness, reducing public expenditures on these social services.

Legislative Packet:

Pathways for All Students to Succeed (PASS) Act
(NOTE: Legislation mentioned in this policy brief was introduced during the 108th Congress. Because it was not passed into law before that Congress adjourned in December 2004, it is now considered “dead.” To receive further consideration, each bill must be re-introduced during the 109th Congress, which began in January 2005.)

The Pathways for All Students to Succeed (PASS) Act, S. 1554, would reform the nation’s secondary schools through a new focus on adolescent literacy, academic counselors, and a new grant program that would improve student achievement in low-performing secondary schools.

The Student Bill of Rights
(NOTE: Legislation mentioned in this policy brief was introduced during the 108th Congress. Because it was not passed into law before that Congress adjourned in December 2004, it is now considered “dead.” To receive further consideration, each bill must be re-introduced during the 109th Congress, which began in January 2005.)

The Student Bill of Rights legislation, H.R. 236, would hold states accountable for providing the necessary resources for an adequate education, which include highly qualified teachers, challenging curricula, up-to-date textbooks and materials, small classes, and guidance counselors for all students who rely on public schools for their education.

The Graduation for All Act
(NOTE: Legislation mentioned in this policy brief was introduced during the 108th Congress. Because it was not passed into law before that Congress adjourned in December 2004, it is now considered “dead.” To receive further consideration, each bill must be re-introduced during the 109th Congress, which began in January 2005.)

The Graduation for All Act, H.R. 3085, would target funding to schools with the lowest graduation rates and create a literacy coach position to work with teachers across the curriculum.

The Alliance’s Teacher and Principal Quality Initiative Policy Brief: An Overview of Current and Proposed Federal Legislation
(NOTE: Legislation mentioned in this policy brief was introduced during the 108th Congress. Because it was not passed into law before that Congress adjourned in December 2004, it is now considered “dead.” To receive further consideration, each bill must be re-introduced during the 109th Congress, which began in January 2005.)

The Alliance’s Teacher and Principal Quality Initiative seeks to improve the academic outcomes for students at risk of dropping out of school by helping high-needs schools recruit, retain, and professionally develop teachers and principals. The initiative builds on current federal legislation and is receiving bipartisan support in Congress and the Bush Administration as evidenced by a variety of proposed bill. This policy brief summarizes the current and proposed federal legislation that supports the Alliance’s Teacher and Principal Quality Initiatives.

Agenda

PowerPoint presentations and student vignettes available below.

Monday, November 17
Challenges Confronting High Schools: Adolescent Literacy

8:45 a.m. Welcome by Susan Frost, Alliance for Excellent Education

9:00 a.m. The American High School Crisis: So What if Johnny Can’t Read? VideoVideo

Perspectives of policymakers, researchers, practitioners, and the funding community are explored by speakers on the front lines in this opening session.

Speakers:
Susan Sclafani, Office of the Secretary and Office of Vocational and Adult Education, U.S. Department of Education
Peggy McCardle, National Institute for Child Health & Human Development
Gerald Tirozzi, National Association of Secondary School Principals
Stefanie Sanford, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

10:15 a.m. Reading is the New Civil Right

Speaker: Phyllis C. Hunter, Phyllis C. Hunter Consulting and Texas Statewide Reading Initiatives

10:40 a.m. Facing the Consequences VideoVideo
Twenty-five percent of America’s eighth graders read at “below basic” levels. What does this mean for the future of our communities and the nation? Representatives of the military, higher education, business, and technology discuss the crisis and its impact on productivity, civic involvement, and national security.

  • Jane M. Arabian, Office of the Under Secretary of Defense, Department of Defense
  • Ana Guzmán, Palo Alto Community College
  • John H. Stevens, Texas Business and Education Coalition
  • Steven G. Zylstra, Pittsburgh Technology Council and Catalyst ConnectionModerated by Sandy Kress, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP

11:30 a.m. Break for Networking

BooksStudent Vignette: Students from Philadelphia and Baltimore talk about why reading is important to them, what books they are currently reading and some of their favorite books.

VideoVideo

12:00 p.m. Working Lunch with Table Focus Groups

Luncheon keynote: Pam Muñoz Ryan, Author, Esperanza Rising VideoVideo
Introduced by Richard Vacca, International Reading Association 

1:15 p.m. Alliance for Excellent Education’s Literacy Reports VideoVideo

Michael Kamil, Stanford University, Adolescents and Literacy: Reading for the 21st Century
Elizabeth Sturtevant, George Mason University, The Literacy Coach: A Key to Improving Teaching and Learning in Secondary Schools

Introduced by Nancy Hoffman, Jobs for the Future

LiteracyStudent Vignette: Students from Philadelphia and Baltimore discuss the frustration they felt when they realized they were not receiving the reading help that they needed in middle school. When they reached high school, they found themselves reading several grade levels behind their peers.

VideoVideo

 

 

 

 

1:45 p.m. Approaches that Work VideoVideo
Effective programs to improve literacy of high school students are proving successful in many communities and states across the nation. This panel will discuss proven, research-based programs that are having an impact at the secondary school level.

3:00 p.m. Break

CongressStudent Vignette: What if kids ran for Congress? How would they integrate reading into their campaign platform?

Once again, we hear from students from Philadelphia and Baltimore. “If I were a Congressman, I would…”

VideoVideo

 

 

 

3:15 p.m. On the Ground VideoVideo
As communities mobilize to support adolescents in improving literacy, stakeholders in the process are expanding. Teams from across the U.S. that have committed to raising adolescent literacy levels will discuss the process of raising citizen awareness and support for programs, and the impact the programs have had thus far.

Moderated by Joseph DiMartino, Education Alliance at Brown University

DropoutsStudent Vignette: Students from Philadelphia and Baltimore discuss the limited futures that await high school dropouts.

VideoVideo

 

 

 

 

4:30 p.m. A Policy Response VideoVideo
Concern is growing about the nation’s dropout rate and the numbers of young Americans who are not achieving academic success. Policymakers will consider ways that a focused national policy on education can help to mobilize support for improving high schools and the outcomes of their students at all levels of government.

Speakers:

Senator Jeff Bingaman (NM)
Congressman Ralph Regula (OH)

Q & A moderated by Hilary Pennington, Jobs for the Future

5:30 p.m. Cocktail Reception in Holeman Lounge

6:30 p.m. Dinner in the Ballroom
Three distinguished Members of Congress will provide an overview of the bills they have recently introduced in the U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives which will help America’s teenagers graduate from high school, go on to college, and enter the working world with the skills they need to succeed. The P.A.S.S. Act and the Graduation for All Act both address our nation’s high school dropout rate and provide the training, guidance, and resources needed to help students stay in school and go on to college.

Keynote Speakers:

Congressman Rubén Hinojosa (TX)
Senator Patty Murray (WA)
Congresswoman Susan Davis (CA)

Introduced by Richard W. Riley, Former U.S. Secretary of Education

Presentation on Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation
William Strauss, Co-Author
William Strauss’ talk focused on the key traits of the Millennial Generation, youth born since 1982. He discussed how these traits can be harnessed to improve graduation and literacy rates. Through American history, society found the will to dramatically raise educational attainment for selected generations; the author believes that the Millennial generation stands to benefit and explained why.

Tuesday, November 18
Challenges Confronting High Schools: Adequacy and Equity

8:45 a.m. The Student Bill of Rights

Speaker: Congressman Chaka Fattah (PA)

9:10 a.m. A State and Federal Perspective on Adequacy and Equity

Speaker: Congressman Chris Van Hollen (MD)

VideoVideo of Reps. Fattah and Van Hollen.

9:30 a.m. The Equity and Adequacy of Education: Litigation and Legislation at the State and Federal Levels VideoVideo
Forty-nine years after Brown v. Board of Education, many schools are still struggling to provide students with an adequate and equitable education. Over the past four decades, courts and legislative bodies at the state and federal levels have made some headway in education reform efforts; however, the fight is far from over. This panel will outline the legal and legislative precedents for education reform and discuss the trends and strategies used today in the continuing quest for educational equity and adequacy.

  • Margaret Goertz, University of Pennsylvania
  • Frederick M. Hess, American Enterprise Institute
  • Lisa Graham Keegan, Education Leaders Council
  • Jack Moreland, Covington Independent Public Schools
  • Michael Rebell, Campaign for Fiscal EquityModerated by William L. Taylor, Citizens’ Commission on Civil Rights

10:45 a.m. Break

11:00 a.m. Now What? Implementing and Accounting for an Adequate Education VideoVideo
New York, Maine, Maryland, and New Jersey are just a few of the states that have attempted to define and implement an adequate education. Each of these states arrived at a mandate for educational adequacy differently and subsequently experienced unique successes and challenges. This panel will focus on the process for defining adequacy, specific components of an adequate education, and the strategies used to implement changes.

  • Samira Ahmed, Campaign for Fiscal Equity
  • J. Duke Albanese, Great Maine Schools Project
  • Anthony P. Carnevale, Educational Testing Service
  • Christopher Maher, Advocates for Children and Youth
  • David G. Sciarra, Education Law CenterModerated by Julie Underwood, National School Boards Association

Noon Where Do We Go From Here?

Susan Frost, Alliance for Excellent Education

Categories: Uncategorized
thumbnail

Action Academy

Welcome to the Alliance for Excellent Education’s Action Academy, an online learning community of education advocates. We invite you to create an account, expand your knowledge on the most pressing issues in education, and communicate with others who share your interests in education reform.

Register Now

or register for Action Academy below:


Join the Conversation

Your email is never published nor shared.

What is this?
Add 11 to 9 =
The simple math problem you are being asked to solve is necessary to help block spam submissions.

Close

 

Every Child a Graduate. Every Child Prepared for Life.