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Stats That Stick: September 6, 2012

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September 06, 2012 05:45 pm

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Take a moment. Imagine it’s winter. You’re outside walking. It’s snowing. You come across a lamp post and contemplate whether the old stories about tongues sticking to icy cold lamp posts are true. Three to four minutes pass. You shrug and walk off while concluding, “It couldn’t possibly be stickier than these statistics from High School Soup.” You’re right.

Number of changes proposed to New Jersey’s public schools by a recent task force: 474.

The Star-Ledger reports that the Education Transformation Task Force convened by Governor Chris Christie has presented a 239 page report to the state Board of Education. The report has been “billed as a way to improve student achievement by freeing schools from rules that restrict innovation and, in some cases, duplicate other regulations.”

Number of school districts receiving more than 20 percent of their annual revenue from the federal government: 1,500+.

Although state and local funding predominantly makes up most school districts’ budgets, new calculations from Jennifer Cohen Kabaker at the New America Foundation finds that in 2010 over 1,500 school districts received more than a fifth of their funding from the federal government. Ed Beat has more.

Number of states that have agreed to an NCLB waiver “do over”: 1.

Education Week reports on the curious case of the Commonwealth of Virginia, which has reached an agreement with the U.S. Department of Education to re-negotiate the previously approved No Child Left Behind waiver. Why the “do over”? Ed Week explains: “Using methodology approved by the U.S. Department of Education, Virginia set new academic achievement targets for schools that do little, if anything, to close the achievement gap for groups of at-risk students. That move, in July, set off a firestorm of controversy within the state, sparking numerous newspaper op-eds, letters to and from state officials, and even a Facebook page in protest over the low expectations set for at-risk students.”

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Stats that Stick

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