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Morning Announcements: August 3, 2011

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August 03, 2011 04:31 pm

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The Washington Post reports that the domestic spending cuts contemplated in the debt-ceiling deal are sure to compound the dire fiscal situation confronting the states, which already are reducing jobs and slashing once-untouchable programs to balance their budgets.

The Christian Science Monitor features an article along the same lines, saying that federal spending cuts mean fewer dollars will flow to the states for unemployment benefits, education, health care, and other state-run programs.

The California Dream Act offers a young illegal immigrant a morale boost, writes the Los Angeles Times.

Kentucky reports a 76 percent high school graduation rate, according to the Bowling Green Daily News.

According to the Denver Post, major education groups in Colorado back proposed state tax hike for K–12 education.

Connecticut education officials are considering seeking a waiver to requirements of the No Child Left Behind law, reports the Connecticut Mirror.

The Rapid City Journal reports that school progress is holding steady in South Dakota, where 94 percent of the state’s public school districts made adequate yearly progress under the federal education improvement law, down 1 percentage point from a year ago.

According the Deseret Morning News in Salt Lake City, students in rural Utah who need special instruction not available at their schools will soon have access to interactive video-conferencing capabilities, thanks to a federal grant.

The Charleston Gazette covers a K–12 education summit in West Virginia focused on dropout prevention and successful transitions through school and into a career.

Education Next reports on its fifth annual survey—conducted jointly with Harvard’s Program on Education Policy and Governance (PEPG)—on a wide range of education issues reveals that the opinions of the public have remained largely unchanged since one year ago; however, teacher opposition to many reforms has increased, placing them more at odds with views of the general public.

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