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Your daily serving of high school news and policy.
Posted: September 13, 2019 05:51 pm

Why End-of-Course Exams Are Being Replaced By the ACT and SAT, and How to Reverse That

Posted:
September 13, 2019 05:51 pm
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This post was originally published in the Fordham Institute’s Flypaper.

In the last month, two reports have renewed questions about the current direction of states’ high school assessments. The first, End-of-Course Exams and Student Outcomes, from Fordham’s Adam Tyner and Lafayette College’s Matthew Larsen, finds that end-of-course assessments (EOCs)—tests designed around specific high school courses, like algebra II or biology—are correlated with higher high school graduation rates and college admissions test scores. Despite these positive effects, however, Tyner and Larsen also find that EOCs may be slipping in popularity among states. The second report, The New Testing Landscape: How State Assessments are Changing under the Federal Every Student Succeeds Act, by Lynn Olson of FutureEd, reveals one of the reasons why: the rise of the ACT or SAT as states’ primary high school assessments.

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Categories:
Assessments, Every Student Succeeds Act
Posted: September 06, 2019 03:43 pm

Deeper Learning Digest: Is School Innovation Lost in the Education Echo Chamber?

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September 06, 2019 03:43 pm
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If a school is making a difference for students through new and innovative practices and word gets lost in the education echo chamber, how can other schools and students benefit?

Today’s digest highlights a new project by the Christensen Institute to uncover under-the-radar schools that are transforming the learning process and driving better outcomes for students, a California district that is transforming schools with lessons from brain science, strategies to refresh school culture, and an upcoming conference on the future of K-12 education.

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Categories:
Deeper Learning, Deeper Learning Digest
Posted: September 06, 2019 11:18 am

Ten Things to Know About Trauma and Learning

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September 06, 2019 11:18 am
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Research from neuroscience highlights that adolescence represents a critical period for brain development—second in importance only to early childhood. This research shows that adolescence is a period when the human brain develops the capacity to engage in key elements of learning, such as critical thinking and problem solving. In fact, the degree to which adults can engage in analytic thinking depends largely upon the degree to which this capacity develops during adolescence. While it is well known that adolescence is a period of heightened risk for behaviors such as truancy and substance use, the “risk” of adolescence is not solely about problem behaviors. It also is about potentially limiting the ability to thrive as an adult.  

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Uncategorized
Posted: August 16, 2019 10:55 am

Federal Flash: Change to Free School Lunch Program Could Negatively Impact 500,000 Low-Income Students

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August 16, 2019 10:55 am
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Today’s Federal Flash covers the FCC’s proposal to alter E-rate funding, why half a million students could lose automatic eligibility for free school lunches, and updates on the appropriations process heating up in Congress.

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Categories:
Digital Equity, E-Rate, Federal Flash
Posted: August 14, 2019 01:34 pm

How Can Schools Support Adolescent Students?

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August 14, 2019 01:34 pm
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Think back to your middle school experience. Do the words “awkward,” “angsty,” and “misunderstood,” come to mind? It’s no wonder that adolescence is often considered a difficult and complicated age. But given that adolescents make up nearly one-fourth of the U.S. population, not understanding and serving the needs of young people in this stage of life is not an option.

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Categories:
Science of Adolescent Learning, Science of Learning
Posted: August 13, 2019 12:33 pm

The Challenges and Privileges of Being a First-Generation College Student

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August 13, 2019 12:33 pm
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As a first-generation college student who transferred from a local community college, graduating from Georgetown University is my life’s biggest accomplishment to date. Yet as I reflect on my educational journey, my heart is filled with dismay as much as it is with pride. Graduating from high school is a privilege many youth throughout America never attain. Currently, one out of every eight public high schools that enrolls 100 students or more in America has a graduation rate of 67 percent or less, according to the latest Building a Grad Nation report. This simple statistic brings me to a place of duality as I grapple with my personal challenges and privileges as a first-generation college student.

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Categories:
College Remediation, College- and Career-Ready Standards
Posted: August 01, 2019 03:08 pm

Deeper Learning Digest: Professional Learning Strategies for Deeper Learning

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August 01, 2019 03:08 pm
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When teachers work collaboratively to identify specific student skill gaps, they can improve learning for all students more quickly.

Today’s digest highlights a professional learning strategy that encourages teachers to intentionally uncover student learning gaps, steps to help students share their learning in public, a whole school approach to professional learning, and a new podcast on preparing teachers for deeper learning.

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Categories:
Deeper Learning, Deeper Learning Digest
Posted: July 29, 2019 03:12 pm

Federal Flash: How the Federal Government Could Improve School Safety

Posted:
July 29, 2019 03:12 pm
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Today’s Federal Flash covers a flurry of activity from last week around school safety, gun violence, and school discipline. It also spotlights two new bills in Congress to help students prepare for and complete college.

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Categories:
College- and Career-Ready Standards, Federal Flash, High School Graduation Rates and Secondary School Improvement, Higher Education, School Climate, School Safety
Every Child a Graduate. Every Child Prepared for Life.