boilerplate image
Your daily serving of high school news and policy.
Bob_wise_01
Posted:
November 09, 2017 08:23 am
Featured Entry:

Want to Implement Personalized Learning? Permission Granted!

RSS feed

Can two conferences held thirty-five miles apart indicate that a personalized learning movement is growing, especially if they take place in the heart of California’s Silicon Valley? And is there a common message when talking to wide-ranging audiences of teachers, ed-tech entrepreneurs, cutting-edge educators, and district leaders who must confront constant challenges of running a district while envisioning the future of learning?

Read Entire Post

Categories:
Deeper Learning, Every Student Succeeds Act, Personalized Learning
Posted: September 01, 2010 03:24 pm

Morning Announcements: September 1, 2010

Posted:
September 01, 2010 03:24 pm
RSS feed

Morning_AnnouncementsThe New York Times takes a look at value-added modeling, a method to calculate the value teachers add to their students’ achievement, based on changes in test scores from year to year and how the students perform compared with others in their grade.

An article in Washington Monthly takes a look at College Dropout Factories. To read more about high school dropout factories, check out the Alliance’s brief, Prioritizing the Nation’s Lowest-Performing High Schools.

Read Entire Post

Categories:
Uncategorized
Posted: August 31, 2010 08:16 pm

Transforming Teaching and Learning

Posted:
August 31, 2010 08:16 pm
RSS feed

TransformingTeaching_LearningWhile 36 states plus the District of Columbia have moved to adopt the common core state standards, to fundamentally improve teacher and leader effectiveness, the federal government will need to provide support for their implementation.  Setting standards is only the first step in an improvement process; states must implement assessments that measure whether students are meeting the standards, develop or acquire curricular materials aligned to the standards, and, most importantly, must prepare teachers to teach to the new standards. The federal government can have an important role in improving teacher education by leveraging resources and creating incentives to enable states to develop systems consistent with expectations for student learning.

Traditional licensure exams have come under attack for their lack of authenticity and ability to measure whether teachers will be effective in the classroom. On the other hand, studies show that that rigorous, validated, standards-based performance measures, such as those used by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, can be a powerful tool for capturing how teaching is enacted in a complex context and for providing feedback for continuous improvement. These measures use multiple elements such as direct observations and videotapes, analyses of student work, and measures of student learning. They can serve a number of policy purposes—to strengthen the quality of preparation and credentialing programs, induction systems, professional learning and licensure, and compensation and advancement. The federal government could support the development of robust teacher performance assessments that serve as a key component of evaluation systems along with the use of growth measures for student achievement.

Professional learning and continuing education should focus—not solely on the accumulation of course credits—but on developing skilled practice by providing teachers with more coherence in the feedback and supervision they receive. In addition, support and training should address the urgent need to conceptualize teaching differently, shape differentiated roles for teachers and school leaders, and create novel team-based approaches to organizing learning environments.  Educator development policies that ignore using a fuller, fairer sense of teachers’ performance will, in effect, serve to undermine teaching as a profession.

One of the most important ways that the federal government can support the improvement of teacher preparation is by investing in research in effective practice. A recent report by the National Research Council found that the state of research on teacher preparation is woefully inadequate; the study could not find answers to some of the most basic questions about a critical component of the U.S. education system. By placing a priority on research on teacher preparation, and disseminating results widely, the U.S. Institute of Education Sciences can build the knowledge base about effective practices and drive improvements.

To learn more about the misalignment of current policies that shape teacher development in the United States and ways to reframe human capital systems to deliver on the promise of next-generation learning, check out a Call for Action: Transforming Teaching and Learning to Prepare High School Students for College and Careers.

Categories:
Uncategorized
Posted: August 31, 2010 03:52 pm

Morning Announcements: August 31, 2010

Posted:
August 31, 2010 03:52 pm
RSS feed


Morning_AnnouncementsEducation Week
takes a look at states’ progress in complying with No Child Left Behind’s requirement that states report graduation rates for subgroups of students, such as English-language learners or economically disadvantaged children.

The Christian Science Monitor profiles Arne Duncan and his career path leading up to serving as the 9th U.S. Secretary of Education.

Read Entire Post

Categories:
Uncategorized
Posted: August 30, 2010 04:05 pm

Morning Announcements: August 30, 2010

Posted:
August 30, 2010 04:05 pm
RSS feed

Morning_AnnouncementsNineteen states are participating in the Teacher Performance Assessment Consortium, a pilot program to develop performance-based assessments for teacher candidates.

Washington Post columnist George Will writes about black children’s “Daunting divide in achievement and family life.” And education columnist Jay Matthews takes a look at how the achievement gap has been reported in the district.

Read Entire Post

Categories:
Uncategorized
Posted: August 27, 2010 07:34 pm

Project Win-Win

Posted:
August 27, 2010 07:34 pm
RSS feed

The Institute for Higher Education Policy has paired up with the Lumina Foundation for Education to create Project Win-Win, an effort to contact former community college and college student dropouts and let them know that either a) their academic records qualify them for an associate’s degree that can be retroactively awarded or b) they were only short of earning an associate degree by a few credits and are welcome back to complete their education.

Read Entire Post

Categories:
Uncategorized
Posted: August 26, 2010 03:18 pm

Morning Announcements 8.26.10

Posted:
August 26, 2010 03:18 pm
RSS feed

Morning_AnnouncementsYesterday in Little Rock, Secretary Duncan asked public schools to provide educators with a more student achievement data and parents with more  information on teacher effectiveness, according to the Washington Post.

In Indiana, more than 21,000 Indiana high school students earned college credits through Ivy Tech Community College last year which saved parents more than $10 million in tuition bills according to the Indianapolis Business Journal.

Read Entire Post

Categories:
Uncategorized
Posted: August 25, 2010 06:08 pm

Time is of the essence

Posted:
August 25, 2010 06:08 pm
RSS feed

School_ClosedforSummerThere has been much discussion in Washington, as well as in school districts around the nation, about how time can be used to provide expanded learning opportunities for students (especially those who are low-performing and at risk of dropping out).  With a high school dropout rate that should keep all of us up at night and U.S. students underperforming their international counterparts, there is good reason for educators, communities, and policymakers to be thinking about how time is being used (or misused) in schools.

Read Entire Post

Categories:
Uncategorized
Every Child a Graduate. Every Child Prepared for Life.