Highlights from the Latest PISA Results

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Posted:
December 04, 2019 10:53 am

U.S. fifteen-year-olds ranked 8th in reading, 11th in science, and 30th in math according to the latest results from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), released on December 3. Their performance placed U.S. teenagers above the international average in reading and science, below it in math, and in roughly the same spot from the previous assessment three years ago in all three subjects.

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Categories:
International Comparisons

How Latino Students Are Boosting the Nation’s Economy

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Posted:
October 17, 2019 02:46 pm

Between 2000 and 2015, the percentage of Latino students enrolled in public elementary and secondary schools increased from 16 percent to 26 percent while the percentages of White students fell from 61 percent to 49 percent, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. From 2015 to 2027, the percentage of Latino students is expected to continue to increase—from 26 percent to 29 percent—while the percentage of White students will fall from 49 percent to 45 percent.

As Latino students become a larger component of the K-12 student population, we must ensure they receive an education that prepares them for future success. In some ways we are–and they are delivering benefits to the economy in return–but in many other ways, we are not.

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Categories:
#OurChallengeOurHope, Economic Impacts, Education and the Economy, High School Graduation Rates and Secondary School Improvement

Ideas for Enhancing School Safety Against Targeted Violence

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Posted:
July 25, 2019 07:55 am

Today at 9:30 a.m. the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee is holding a hearing on state and federal recommendations for enhancing school safety against targeted violence. In the following letter to Committee Chairman Ron Johnson and top Democrat Gary Peters, Alliance for Excellent Education President Deb Delisle outlines our ideas to ensure that students and educators feel safe in schools and are safe in schools.

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Categories:
School Climate, School Safety

Did Busing Work?

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Posted:
July 17, 2019 04:18 pm

In the years after the Brown vs. Board of Education decision, school districts turned to busing students to achieve racial diversity. Today, sixty-five years after the Brown decision, did busing work? What do research and advocates say about busing, its impact, and possible solutions for an education system in which many U.S. schools are more segregated today than they were decades ago?

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Categories:
#OurChallengeOurHope, Brown vs. Board

High School Graduation Rate Hits New High, But Concerns Remain; How Does Your State Fare?

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Posted:
January 30, 2019 01:03 pm

The nation’s high school graduation rate hit a new all-time high of 84.6 percent and graduation rates for historically underserved students continue to rise, according to data released last week by the U.S. Department of Education. However, the size of the graduation rate increase was much smaller than in previous years and large gaps continue to exist between student groups.

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Categories:
High School Graduation Rates and Secondary School Improvement

Explaining Teenagers’ Attraction to Social Media and Risky Behavior—And Why It’s Not Necessarily a Bad Thing

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Posted:
October 09, 2018 01:25 pm

Ever wonder why teenagers are so quick to adopt Instagram, Snapchat, and other forms of social media? Or take up X Games sports such as skateboarding and snowboarding? A new report by the Alliance for Excellent Education (All4Ed) explains how changes in the brain make adolescents more likely to be influenced by their peers, take risks, and even become disengaged in school as their motivations change. It also includes advice and guidance for educators, parents, and policymakers.

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Categories:
SAL Resource, Science of Adolescent Learning

Deeper Learning Digest: Star Wars, Social Media, and Skateboarding

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Posted:
September 28, 2018 03:51 pm

Is it possible to test how creative someone is? There are quite a few tests on the internet that claim to do so. Of course, there are also “tests” on the internet than can tell you which Star Wars character you are. We know the people designing those tests are creative, but what about your regular American student?

This week’s Deeper Learning Digest covers a new creativity test designed for U.S. fifteen-year-olds and their international peers. It will also explain why fifteen-year-olds and other adolescents are hard-wired to adopt social media and take up extreme sports such as skateboarding and snowboarding. Finally, it will examine the common, the controversial, and why March—and not December—could be the most wonderful time of the year.

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Deeper Learning Digest

Examining (and Preventing) the Long-Term Effects of Border Separations on Children

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Posted:
July 18, 2018 03:58 pm

“I felt like a prisoner.” “I felt like a dog.” “I don’t want to remember.” “They told us to behave or we’d be there forever.”

Through the experiences of six children separated at the border from their families, Washington Post reporter Michael E. Miller provides a disturbingly powerful account of how two months in a Texas shelter traumatized the children kept there. Left unknown is how the experience will impact these children over the rest of their lives, although experts say the effect likely will be profound.

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Uncategorized

The Role of Race and Sex in School Discipline

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Posted:
May 09, 2018 01:04 pm

“Students who are suspended from school lose important instructional time, are less likely to graduate on time, and are more likely to repeat a grade, drop out of school, and become involved in the juvenile justice system.”

That finding comes from a March 2018 report from the Government Accountability Office—often referred to as the government’s watchdog.

So if the research on the negative effects of school suspensions is so clear, why aren’t more schools reconsidering the practice, especially considering very troubling data indicating that black students, boys, and students with disabilities are disproportionately subject to discipline practices?

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Categories:
Discipline, Students of Color