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Afternoon Announcements: October 25, 2011

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October 25, 2011 07:30 pm

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The Huffington Post recaps last Monday night’s Republican primary debate: “There were 15 questions (and answers) on tax reform, 2 on energy and jobs, one heated back-and-forth on health care, 12 questions and responses on immigration, 5 on the home-mortgage crisis, 3 on the “Occupy Wall Street” movement, 4 on religion and values, 4 on the budget deficit, one on terrorism, 4 on foreign policy and a final question on who is the best candidate in general to win the race. How many questions and responses were there on the public education crisis and education reform? Zero.”

The New York Times reports on new A-through-F high school report card that finds only one in four students who enter high school in New York City are ready for college after four years, and less than half enroll.

Education Week reports that in less than three weeks, states will begin turning in their applications for waivers under No Child Left Behind, and then it will be up to a cadre of peer reviewers to help Education Secretary Arne Duncan decide who gets a waiver, and who doesn’t.

Demand is strong for $150 million in latest federal Investing in Innovation program, writes Education Week.

As an increasing number of cash-strapped states turn to virtual schools—where computers replace classmates and students learn via the Internet—a new study is raising questions about their quality and oversight, reports the Washington Post.

MPR News reports that with increasing pressure over the last decade to improve student achievement, a growing body of research highlights the crucial role school principals play in creating good environments for learning. But in Minnesota, there is no uniform method to evaluate the state’s roughly 1,700 principals.

According to the Oregonian, the Oregon City School District has decided to reject a $2.54 million federal grant meant to reward top educators, partly because of philosophical concerns over performance-based pay.

And in Idaho, teacher bonuses will hinge on how well they engage parents in some of the state’s south-central schools, the Times-News reports.

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