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Afternoon Announcements: April 19, 2012

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April 19, 2012 06:31 pm

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Good Afternoon! Here are your latest headlines in education:

According to Education Week, most of the dozen states that have already gotten wiggle room from the No Child Left Behind Act don’t have very good plans in place when it comes to a key piece of the U.S. Department of Education’s requirements for turning around low-performing schools: extending learning time. This assessment comes from a new report by the Center for American Progress.

From the Washington Post, Washington D.C. Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson has introduced a new five-year plan that calls for higher-achieving public schools with longer days and better graduation rates, but she warned that paying for improvements will require closing some campuses.

In Boston, the public schools are facing a ballooning backlog of reviews of special education plans for thousands of students, prompting officials to propose one-time bonuses to staffers to get the job done. But the Boston Globe reports, as of Friday, teams of teachers, administrators and therapists had missed deadlines in meeting with parents of 2,918 students for the federally-required annual reviews. The backlog has swelled by more than 600 cases since February.

The Alliance for Excellent Education continues its debate on the depth of teacher-student interaction and the personal privacy of educators. The Associated Press asks whether students and teachers should ever be allowed to be friends on Facebook? School districts across the country, including the nation’s largest, are weighing that question as they seek to balance the risks of inappropriate contact with the academic benefits of social networking.

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